Complaints

What complaints can the Inspector-General inquire into?

The Inspector-General can inquire into or assist with the following matters.

1.   Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security Act 1996

The Inspector-General can inquire into complaints by members of the public (who are New Zealand persons) or employees or former employees of an intelligence and security agency. The person making the complaint must explain how she/he has been adversely affected by any act, omission, practice, policy, or procedure of an intelligence and security agency.

The commonest complaints relate to adverse recommendations by the NZSIS as to security clearances required for employment.

2.   Privacy Act 1993

The Inspector-General has a role under the Privacy Act 1993. The Government Security Bureau Amendment Act 2013 imported some of the principles of the Privacy Act into the Government Security Bureau Act 2003 and the Inspector-General has jurisdiction to investigate complaints into alleged breaches of s 25B of the Government Security Bureau Act 2003.

3.   Protected Disclosures Act 2000

Under the Protected Disclosures Act 2000, NZIS and GCSB employees may seek information and guidance from the Inspector-General on any matter concerning that Act and the Inspector-General is the only appropriate authority to whom they may disclose information in a “whistleblower” sense.

4.   Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Act 2013

A Network Operator who meets the definition of “New Zealand person” may complain to the Inspector-General about being adversely affected by actions of the GCSB under Part 3 of the Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Act 2013.

If you would like to make a complaint, please see our Make a Complaint page

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